Wednesday, 24 April 2013

A-Z Challenge --"U" is for Unicorn Root


Well, Hello there!!! I am so pleased that you stopped by  to visit!
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    For the past many years I have had an interest...no, make that a fascination with herbs, spices and seasonings. - About how they were used by our ancestors centuries ago for a variety of ailments, and how they are used today to enhance your favorite recipe.

With this in mind I am attempting to present a different herb, spice or seasoning  for each day of the  A-Z Challenge. Please drop by often and perhaps we both will learn something new.

Learn more about these terms

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                                                      "U" is for Unicorn Root


OK, this is where I have to admit that the A-Z Challenge becomes very...hmm what's the word... oh,yeah,... challenging!!! And it's going to become more so!! "X""Y"and"Z" are killers!! Now for "U"..

UNICORN ROOT


(sageherbalhealing.com)
 Both Native Americans and skilled midwives have used this herb for hundreds of years. It is native to North America, but grows best in eastern Canada and the United States. Because of its popularity and the human desire to profit, this herb is now threatened. In fact wild harvesting of this herb is pushing it ever closer to the endangered list.This herb goes by many names; Helonias (more popular in Europe), blazing star and sometimes fairywand.
Of all of the North American territory where False Unicorn Rt. grows, the southern area from Florida to Mississippi has the greatest potential for cultivation of this herb. As this herb became marketed and sold in greater quantities, it began to rapidly decline. This plant is prized for the rhizome (root); once it is harvested it does not grow back. Cultivated False Unicorn beds across the U.S. have shown little to no results in growth of the rhizome. 

(innoveatus.net)
When True Unicorn Root (Aletris farinosa) is dried it becomes a bitter tonic and as a tincture or decoction can been used against flatulence, colic, hysteria. Can be used to treat dyspepsia where there is a lack of urinary phosphates.

Its most valuable property is as a tonic on the female reproductive organs, proving of great use in cases of habitual miscarriage and as a general tonic.






Disclaimer

The material provided on this site is designed for information and educational purposes only. The materials are not intended to be a self diagnostic and/or self treatment tool. I encourage you to use this information as a tool for discussing your condition with your health practitioner.    *The medicinal usages are for informational and educational purposes only*
                                      






15 comments:

  1. Why does mankind interfere with nature? That's another topic, I guess. Some of the things unicorn root is said to treat are so diverse.
    Francene.
    A - Z Challenge
    http://francene-wordstitcher.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. I totally agree with you, Francene. Maybe next A-Z it will be an idea!!LOL

      Patricia, Sugar & Spice & All Things ? Nice

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  2. That's such a shame that a plant would be harvested to the point of elimination when those that do so, know of the consequences. but like Francene has states, that's for another topic.
    Great 'U' post.

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    1. It seems we-as a planet- are intent on killing all the good things.

      Patricia, Sugar & Spice & All Things ? Nice

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  3. I had never heard of Unicorn root and certainly had no idea it was practically growing in my backyard! Great choice for the letter U!
    Monica at Older Mommy Still Yummy

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    1. Thanks,Monica, it is new to me as well, but would like to see it replenished.

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  4. I had never heard of this one! Nice find!

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  5. Never heard of this one. Your case for it being endangered is a good one...

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    1. Thanks, Robin, it is not something I have heard of before, either, but it saddens me that it might be wiped out.
      Patricia, Sugar & Spice & All Things ? Nice

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  6. Wow! I most certainly did learn something and assume I will learn more as I go back through your other posts.

    Thanks so much for your comment and for connecting with me!

    Beverly
    http://bev-thebevelededge.blogspot.com/

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    1. Appreciate your comment, Beverly. Enjoy the rest of the challenge.

      Patricia, Sugar & Spice & All Things ? Nice

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  7. Oh man. I hate that it's endangered. I'd love to grow some myself just to help it recover as I live in south Georgia. Thanks for introducing me to this herb. I'd never heard of it.

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    1. What a generous thing to do and say! It is new to me a well, but want to learn more and hopefully we as a planet, can keep it from extinction. Enjoy the challenge

      Patricia, Sugar & Spice & All Things ? Nice

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  8. Never hear of that one. If it is becoming endangered, it is a pity that man has not been able to cultivate it. Fascinating to hear about this.

    JO ON FOOD, MY TRAVELS AND A SCENT OF CHOCOLATE

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